Wahoo Decks proves aluminum deck materials have great fire safety!

With our aluminum decks, building a deck is an exciting project. But one priority you should not forget is the fire safety of your deck.

“Decks catch fire one of two ways. A burning [amber] landing on the surface of the deck is all that’s required. . . The other common cause of deck fires is flames from unmaintained vegetation igniting the deck from below” (Bolton).  Grill fires, for example, are often a cause for fires and can even lead to the fire dangerously spreading. “32% of grill fires on residential properties start on patios, terraces, screened-in porches, or courtyards, while an additional 24% start on exterior balconies and unenclosed porches” (FEMA).

That’s why it is important to consider a product (such as our aluminum deck options) that is non-combustible and fire-safe when building a deck. However, most decking boards are not fireproof and can easily smoke and smolder.

Wahoo Decks recently decided to investigate the flammability of our aluminum deck boards in a hot charcoal test. This test involved taking hot charcoal from a grill and setting in on decking boards, such as, wood/plastic composite, pressure treated pine, and Brazilian Ipe hardwood and comparing it to AridDek aluminum decking.

Check out the video below to see what happens when hot charcoal lands on decking boards.

It just takes a short amount of time before other boards begin to melt, smolder, smoke and burn to the point of ruin. Whereas AridDek bears no marks or burns and does not even smoke from the hot charcoal. Simply wipe it down and AridDek looks good as new.

Remember the importance of fireproofing your deck when considering decking material options for your deck. Safety is important in all aspects of your home, whether it’s inside or outdoors! Visit Wahoo Decks online to learn more about Wahoo Decks’ other fireproof aluminum decking products or call at 1 (877) 270-9387.

Sources:

Decks in the Line of Fire by Bill Bolton

Grill Fires on Residential Properties FEMA Study